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Unlicensed guides to be barred from trekking areas from Jan

Trekking Agencies´ Association of Nepal (TAAN) and different unions of trekking workers have agreed to bar unlicensed trekking guides from leading groups from January 2015. Kul Bahadur Gurung, second vice president of TAAN, said the decision was taken with the […]

ebc trek

What to be expecting on a trek to everest base camp in nepal ?

Even though our finest endeavor to arrange group for their trekking trip, there will always be a sense of ambiguity and unanswered queries and expectation. Just Looking through guide books, blogs and other related expose cannot prepare you for the prospect, […]

Everest

How to trek to Everest Base Camp

Mount Everest has captivated intrepid men and women since the 1920s. The exploits of legends such as George Mallory, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay put the mighty mountain on the map; thousands have followed, making huge sacrifices – many […]

ap_john_all_climber_wy_140522_16x9_608

U.S. climber survives 70-foot fall in Nepal: ‘Any mistake … I was going to die’

A Western Kentucky University professor is “broken” but alive after surviving a 70-foot fall into a crevasse while climbing in Nepal. John All said he managed to make it out and to his tent, where he was picked up by […]

peak

Nepal opens 104 new peaks for mountaineering

Nepal on Wednesday opened 104 virgin peaks for mountaineering, taking the total number of peaks mountaineers can climb to 414, the Tourism Ministry said. Among the new peaks opened, the Yalung Khang West is the only mountain higher than 8,000 […]

 

Unlicensed guides to be barred from trekking areas from Jan

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Trekking Agencies´ Association of Nepal (TAAN) and different unions of trekking workers have agreed to bar unlicensed trekking guides from leading groups from January 2015.

Kul Bahadur Gurung, second vice president of TAAN, said the decision was taken with the objective of controlling illegal operation of trekking business.

TAAN has also increased daily wage of trekkers by Rs 250 to Rs 300 effective from October for a period of two years.

According to Gurung, TAAN revises daily wage of trekking workers every two years. “This new wage will come into effect from October,” he added.

According to TAAN, daily wage of guides, assistant guides, cook and kitchen assistant have been increased by Rs 200 and porter (assistant worker) by Rs 300. With the fresh hike in daily wage, guides, assistant guides and assistant workers in Langtang and Annapurna region will get Rs 1,250, Rs 1,100 and Rs 1,150 per day, respectively. Similarly, guides, assistant guides and porters in the Everest region will get Rs 1,350, Rs 1,250 and Rs 1,150 per day, respectively. At present, they are getting Rs 1,100, Rs 1,000 and Rs 850 per day, respectively.

Likewise, guides, cooks and kitchen assistants going for camping trek will now get Rs 1,050, Rs 1,000 and Rs 950 per day, respectively, up from Rs 800, Rs 750 and Rs 700 per day. Similarly, assistant guides and assistant workers will now receive Rs 950 and Rs 1,150 per day, respectively.

TAAN has also agreed to form Worker´s Welfare Fund as per the demand of trekking workers. “We will deposit a minimum of Rs 15 million from TIMS Fund as seed money into the fund under the Social Security Scheme of the government,” added Gurung.

Similarly, TAAN has also asked its member companies to provide Rs 8,000 annually to guide, cook and Sherpas as festival allowance once a year. The association has also said it would raise wages of guides and porters going on mountaineering expeditions.

TAAN and trekking workers have agreed to implement the provision of ´No trekking without guide or porter´, according to Gurung.

What to be expecting on a trek to everest base camp in nepal ?

ebc trek

ebc trek

Even though our finest endeavor to arrange group for their trekking trip, there will always be a sense of ambiguity and unanswered queries and expectation. Just Looking through guide books, blogs and other related expose cannot prepare you for the prospect, sounds and smells of Nepal to trek to Everest base camp.

 

Trek to Everest Base Camp is by far the most demanding trek, we AME Treks wanted to list the most popular questions and expectations people should have. An open mind and sense of adventure and enthusiasm are always a Top Priority!

 

1: It’s not as tough as people think
In spite of the books, movies and other stuffs you hear and read about on the news and the Internet, the hike to Everest Base Camp does not require you to be a super athlete or experienced hiker and climber. Somebody who is in good fitness and exercises on a regular basis can comfortably and safely complete this trekking route. Yes, altitude will always be the big unknown, but as most of us can’t train at altitude there’s no reason to offensively worry about it. There are some hard-hitting / long days walking to Base Camp (17,500 feet) and hiking up Kala Pathar (18,200 feet), but a slow and steady pace and proper hydration go a long way. If you don’t expect it to be easy and prepare yourself for it to not be, you will probably be pleasantly astonished that it is not as bad as you thought.

 

2: Trekking is a great mode to catch up on forty winks
There’s not much to do after dinner except chat with your travel partners and guide, Play cards with your trekking members, read a book and go to sleep. A typical wake-up time is around 6 am (unless for the sunrise at Kalapatther or any sunrise point along the route), breakfast at 7am and you are on the trail by 8 am. A standard day consists of 5 to 8 hours of walking duration with lots of ups and downs.

 

3: Altitude – The Big Unknown Factor
Regardless of your fitness level, altitude sickness can strike anyone at anytime even if you have been on a trek previously with no problem. At some point on the EBC Trek, everyone will get the basic symptoms of shortness of breath and mild headaches. Symptoms like severe headaches, nausea, vomiting and fever are much more serious and require instant descent to lower height. The best advice is to drink lots of fluids, pace yourself, get plenty of rest at night, keep yourself warm and eat proper amounts of food. Listen to your body. If you are having issues inform your trekking guide and please don’t try to tough it out.

 

 

4: Dietetic fear
The various lodges along the Everest Trail can cater (remarkably) to a wide range of diets. Just because the local staple diet is rice, lentils and vegetables, doesn’t mean you have to give up on chicken or beef. Meat products will become scarce at the higher villages (there is no refrigeration along the way), so you may have to fall back on that good old can of Spam. Hey, it’s a meat product! All kidding aside, the food is good and plentiful on the Everest Trek. The shops and bakeries along the way offer plenty to supplement your three main daily meals and baked and packaged goods are always safe. If you are a true carnivore, pack some jerky with you! It is a great source of protein and it will kill those hunger!

 

5: Heights
Many people have no idea they have a fear of heights until they are face to face in contact. Don’t worry, the trek to Everest Base Camp is rather straight-forward and does not involve any climbing. However, the route is serviced by many suspension bridges along the way and some are quite long and sway quite a bit. For those who know they suffer with heights these are good times when looking down may not be comforting.

 

6: Sleeping bag even on a lodge trek
Even on a lodge trek to Everest Base Camp, you will want to bring a lightweight (20 degree F) sleeping bag to supplement the bedding provided. As with most accommodation in the Himalaya, the higher you go the more rustic the accommodation. The lodges from Dingboche to Gorakshep are cinder block structures with metal roofs. Except for the main dining area, which has a large pot belly stove, the rooms are neither insulated or heated. You will welcome your warm down sleeping on these few nights up high. If you are traveling in November through early March, you’ll want to bring a down sleeping bag rated to zero degrees F. It can get very cold on a Christmas or New Years departure. Clothes-wise, pack accordingly. At almost no point on this trek, except for maybe Lukla or Phakding, is it shorts and t-shirt weather. Thermal layers, fleece jacket and pants and a down jacket are recommended.

 

 

7: What is Kala Pattar?
Regardless of being called the Everest Base Camp, few group realize that you can’t actually see Mount Everest from Base Camp. There are too many other huge mountains in the way. However, don’t vex or let this fact sway you away from doing this trek, there are plenty of opportunities to spot Everest, and if you want to see it up close and personal, you can do the optional hike (4 hours round-trip from Gorakshep) up to Kala Pattar at 18,200 feet. Kala Pattar is a brown “hill” situated on the opposite side of the valley and offers those amazing sunrise and sunset views of Everest, Lhotse and Nuptse on all the postcards.

 

8: give in to the yaks
Don’t learn this the hard way. Yaks ALWAYS have the right of way. Don’t even try to clash it or you will get hurt! For you, it is a tourist route. For them, it is a exertion trail. ALWAYS stay on the uphill side when a faced with a yak train on the trail. Do not try to bypass or out run a yak when faced with a bridge crossing. Be patient, let them pass, as you probably need a rest stop anyway.

 

9: Don’t forget to be cool !!
Please don’t allow the above implication and fore warnings get you down. The hike to Everest Base Camp is one of the best trekking routes in the world . It’s going to be hard at times, you’ll face many challenges, you may get a head or stomach ache…,but this trek is a lot of fun and a great personal accomplishment!

 

10: The Khumbu Cough
The Khumbu Cough is well-known amongst those having already completed this trek. This bothersome tiny cough is named after the region you are trekking in. Basically, it is a high altitude nagging cough (caused by the dry air and at times dusty trail). The best way to avoid or limit this cough is to cover your mouth and nose while trekking when the trail gets covered in dust. Use a scarf, bandana or a Buff to act as a filter for the air. Also, bring along zinc lozenges or hard candies to alleviate some of the discomfort.

 AME Treks Everest Base Camp Package

Group Match Schedule -Fifa World Cup 2014

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Group Match Schedule -Fifa World Cup 2014

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How to trek to Everest Base Camp

Everest

Mount Everest has captivated intrepid men and women since the 1920s. The exploits of legends such as George Mallory, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay put the mighty mountain on the map; thousands have followed, making huge sacrifices – many with their lives – in their own attempts to the summit.

But today, the trek to Everest Base Camp has become an achievable goal for people from all walks of life who want a glimpse of the world’s highest peak. In 2012, between 35,000 and 37,000 people trekked in the Everest region.

What’s it like trekking to Everest Base Camp?

Aside from breathtaking scenery, travellers to the region can experience unique Sherpa culture by visiting monasteries and museums along the way. Days are filled with walking for the sheer pleasure of it, past colourful prayer wheels and across swing bridges straight out of an Indiana Jones movie, while evenings are rewarded with hot food and conversation with like-minded people around the dining-room fire.

The heady mix of natural beauty, fascinating culture and a personal sense of achievement, as well as warm Nepalese hospitality, makes the Everest Base Camp trek one of the world’s most unforgettable.

When should I make the trek?

From March to May and from September to December. It gets hot in May, just before the monsoon season; be prepared for possible rain. December reaches below-zero temperatures but the days are still beautiful and there are fewer trekkers (but remember to wrap up warm in the evenings).

Do I need a guide?

The Nepal government is considering making the hiring of a guide compulsory this season, after the disappearances of some lone trekkers and the death of a Belgian trekker in the Langtang region in June 2012.

But the solo trekking ban has been put on hold, so for now it’s still possible to go it alone. But hiring a guide or porter has many advantages: for US$10 to $20 a day you’re giving someone a valuable job and in turn you will learn plenty about the local culture and natural environment.

A trekking company offers the advantage of having everything arranged for you, including airport transfers, accommodation and porters and/or guides and their insurance. You can book before you go with western tour companies, though you’ll pay significantly less by booking in Kathmandu – ensure they’re registered with the Trekking Agencies Association of Nepal (TAAN). For a list of registered companies visit www.taan.org.np.

How do I get in shape?

Nothing can really prepare you for the trek’s extreme hills and altitude of up to 5545m.  But don’t be put off – people with average fitness can do this trek. ‘Slow and steady’ is the key to achieving, and enjoying, your trek.

Prepare with cardiovascular training several times a week: cycling, swimming, hill climbing and lots of walking. Aim for a five-hour walk once a week. Seek out hills or find a tall building and repeatedly walk up and down the stairs.

What should I take?

Pack lightly – aim for 10 to 15kg. Consider your porter’s load before you include that big bottle of shampoo or pair of jeans.

A fleece jacket, down jacket and thermal underwear are a must, as the Himalaya gets cold above 3000m any time of the year. Also take two pairs of long pants, two or three T-shirts (synthetic fabrics – not cotton – that wick away sweat), and another warm jumper or light fleece.

Footwear requires lightly broken-in boots, trekking socks, and sneakers or sandals for evenings. You will also need a raincoat, gloves, woollen hat, sunhat and polarised sunglasses. A good sleeping bag (rated to -20°C/0°F) is essential; if it’s winter, a thermal liner makes it extra toasty.

Opt for travel-size toiletries, including a good sunscreen, lip balm, travel towel and tissues. Baby wipes are handy for days when you can’t shower.

Your first aid kit should include medication for diarrhoea, antibiotics for a chest or sinus infection, and adhesive bandages for blisters. Visit your doctor for Nepal-specific immunisations. Using two 1L water bottles with water purification tablets is a reliable and safe way to drink water – and more environmentally friendly than buying bottled water from lodges.

Staying healthy and safe on the trek

Take your time. Altitude sickness can affect anybody – even the extremely fit. (The acclimatisation days, usually at Namche and Dingboche, are set for a reason.) Watch for signs of altitude sickness: symptoms include headaches, dizziness, sleeplessness, loss of appetite and breathlessness. Bring a supply of the medication Diamox for treatment; if symptoms persist, descend.

Be vegetarian. As tempting as it is to try a juicy yak steak or ‘buff burger’, be aware that all meat is carried up by porters from below Lukla due to the no-killing policy in Sagamartha National Park, so by the time you have it, it’s getting old. The safest, healthiest option is to eat dal bhat (lentil soup with rice) – it’s made fresh daily and is a great source of protein and energy. As the saying goes, ‘Dal bhat power, 24 hour!’

Cover up. The sun here is harsh, so use a good sunscreen and reapply regularly. Wear long-sleeved tops, long pants and a light scarf – or be prepared to blister.

Little chance of rescuing Indian mountaineer alive: Nepal government

Nepal’s tourism ministry Saturday said that there is very little chance of rescuing alive Indian mountaineer Chhanda Gayen and two Sherpas who have been missing since Monday.

“As soon as we came to know about the incident, Nepal government, local administration, Indian embassy in Kathmandu, Seven Summit Treks Pvt Ltd and relatives and family members of Gayen came together for the rescue bid and search operation which is still under way,” Nepal’s Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation said in a statement.

source:nepalnews.com